Phyllis Rosser
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THE WOMEN OF THE SYLVIA SLEIGH COLLECTIONGROUNDBREAKING: THE WOMEN OF THE SYLVIA SLEIGH COLLECTION
FEATURING BEFORE NIGHT FALLS BY PHYLLIS ROSSER

Rowan University Art Gallery
August 29 - October 1, 2011

Driftwood and Acrylic. 48x89x10 inches


 

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NATURE ABSTRACTED: AN EXHIBITION BY PHYLLIS ROSSER AT CERES
MARCH 29 - APRIL 23, 2011

Opening Reception: April 1st, 6 - 8 p.m.

ceresgallery.org

 

New York, NY (March 1, 2011) - In her solo exhibition opening March 29th, Phyllis Rosser continues exploring the power of natural forms. Branches and tree limbs stripped of their bark by the Connecticut River in Vermont are assembled into large abstract constructions that mirror natural compositions in the landscape. One wall mounted piece moves along a ten foot wall like a meandering stream. Although its form is rigid, it echos the patterns of rocks being clustered together as water rushes over them. Other vertically woven pieces create a small forest, recalling a safe haven in her childhood in their wooded gathering on the gallery floor.

Rosser is attracted to the tumbled branches that wash onto the river bank and begin to turn silvery gray as they lie in the sun. The energy of the wood grains and the variety of colors - beige, charcoal, rust, as well as gray, have a power for her as expressions of the diffuse, non-linear excitement of nature. Remembering the beauty of the weathered barn doors of her childhood, she revalues this material that is often considered refuse, suggesting that something endures even as the tree breaks apart. Her work expresses her experiences of nature, both fl eeting moments and enduring moods.

Her sculptures have been called “drawings in space,“ and compared to the muscular brush strokes of abstract expressionist painters like Joan Mitchell, Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollack. Art Historian/Critic Anne Swartz says Rosser’s sculptures become “talismans of nature’s force, power and beauty. . . The line of the forms seem to follow throughout the composition, breaking and undulating, recalling their surging through water.”

Nature Abstracted will include 5 large and 15 smaller wall hung pieces as well as 4 free standing works. This is Phyllis Rosser’s 17th solo show. She is represented in numerous private and public collections including the Microsoft Art Collection, the Smith College Museum of Art and Johnson & Johnson and has appeared in many group shows in New York, New Jersey and New England.

Rosser’s work will be on display at Ceres Gallery from March 29th through April 23th, 2011. A reception for the artist will be held on April 1st, from 6-8 p.m. The gallery is located at 547 West 27th Street, New York, NY and is open Tuesdays through Saturdays from noon to 6 p.m., Thursdays until 8 p.m. Contact Ceres at: 212.947.6100 or art@ceresgallery.org for gallery information.

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Posted in March, 2008

In her solo exhibition at Ceres Gallery opening April 22nd, Phyllis Rosser continues her investigation into the visual play of natural forms and images with an installation of branches, tree limbs and grasses. This complements her powerful wall-mounted constructions of found wood that twist and knot along with her more openly woven pieces in natural wood stripped of its bark which she finds on the banks of the Connecticut River in Vermont.
In the decaying branches thrown on the shore, especially as they turn silvery gray, she sees the weathered barn doors of her childhood. The energy of the wood - its subtle grays, beiges and charcoals and infinite patterns of grains as well as it’s broken forms have a power for her, suggesting something that endures even as a tree breaks apart. She revalues a material often considered refuse. In recent years, the sculptural patterns of natural landscapes have drawn her interest as she tries to capture their volumes, contours and colors in her installations. The random masses of plants and the wind blowing through fields of grasses create a powerful energy and geometry that excite as well as soothe.

Art Historian/Critic Anne Swartz says Rosser’s work is an “ongoing search for the stunning in natural-occurring forms...They become talismans of nature’s force, power and beauty.” She notes their calligraphic quality: “The line of the forms seem to follow throughout the composition, breaking and undulating, recalling their surging through water,” connecting her to 20th Century painters who freed line from description like Jackson Pollock and Cy Twombly.

Nature Reassembled will include 6 large wall sculptures and 20 smaller pieces as well as 9 paintings of large flowers which further reveal her fascination with the colors, textures and sensuality of nature. Swartz has said “the intertwining or overlaid elements (of the paintings) recall the sculptural compositions” of her wall pieces. The flowers are “both beautiful (lovely palette, pleasing shapes and vital forms) and sublime (prompting a sense of awe at the spectacle of nature, diminishing human presence in the process).”

This is Phyllis Rosser’s 11th solo show. She is represented in numerous private and public collections including the Microsoft Art Collection, the Smith College Museum of Art and Johnson & Johnson and has appeared in many group shows in NY, NJ, and VT.

 
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